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AI Digest#166

this week's favorite

Deep learning over the internet: Training language models collaboratively

Modern language models often require a significant amount of compute for pretraining, making it impossible to obtain them without access to tens and hundreds of GPUs or TPUs. Though in theory it might be possible to combine the resources of multiple individuals, in practice, such distributed training methods have previously seen limited success because connection speeds over the Internet are way slower than in high-performance GPU supercomputers.

Only train once: One-shot DNN training and pruning framework

A research team from Microsoft, Zhejiang University, Johns Hopkins University, Georgia Institute of Technology and University of Denver proposes Only-Train-Once (OTO), a one-shot DNN training and pruning framework that produces a slim architecture from a full heavy model without fine-tuning while maintaining high performance.

How AI Generates New Images: GANs Put Simply

Understand how AI creates new images using Generative Adversarial Networks in 2 minutes.

Data Engineers of Netflix — Interview with Kevin Wylie

This post is part of our “Data Engineers of Netflix” series, where our very own data engineers talk about their journeys to Data Engineering @ Netflix.

On infinitely wide neural networks that exhibit feature learning

In the pursuit of learning about fundamentals of the natural world, scientists have had success with coming at discoveries from both a bottom-up and top-down approach. Neuroscience is a great example of the former. Spanish anatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal discovered the neuron in the late 19th century. While scientists’ understanding of these building blocks of the brain has grown tremendously in the past century, much about how the brain works on the whole remains an enigma. In contrast, fluid dynamics makes use of the continuum assumption, which treats the fluid as a continuous object. The assumption ignores fluid’s atomic makeup yet makes accurate calculations simpler in many circumstances.